Management of a Penetrating Thoracic Injury with Thoracoscopy; A Case Study

  • Hossein Zabihi Department of Surgery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9092-5124
  • Pezhman Farshidmehr Department of Surgery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Reza Hajebi Department of Surgery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Ehsan Rahimpour Department of Surgery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Payam Vezvaei Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Keywords: Case Management, Implements in-situ, Thoracic Injuries, Thoracoscopy, Wounds, Penetrating

Abstract

Introduction: Various strategies could be considered dealing with penetrating thoracic injuries. Thoracoscopy is much less invasive than routine thoracotomy approach for managing such cases in which the sharp object remains in the body. The case presented in this article was managed with thoracoscopy for a penetrating dorsolateral thoracic injury. Case Presentation: A 35-year-old man with a penetrating dorsolateral thoracic injury referred to the emergency department. Despite an elevated pulse rate, the patient has proper blood pressure and O2 saturation. Considering the patient's stability and the results of imaging which did not show any massive vascular injury, the patient was taken to the operation room for thoracoscopy. At thoracoscopy, we saw 4 cm of the blade in the thoracic cavity between the third and fourth intercostal space. There was a mild laceration of lung tissue without any active bleeding. Considering the position of the blade and the absence of active bleeding and vascular injury at the trauma site, we successfully removed the blade by the thoracoscope without any complications. Conclusion: Our experience of removing a retained knife by thoracoscopy showed that it can be an appropriate alternative for patients with penetrating thoracic injury who are hemodynamically stable and have appropriate conditions for thoracoscopy.

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Published
2019-07-01
How to Cite
Zabihi, H., Farshidmehr, P., Hajebi, R., Rahimpour, E., & Vezvaei, P. (2019). Management of a Penetrating Thoracic Injury with Thoracoscopy; A Case Study. Advanced Journal of Emergency Medicine, 4(1), e11. https://doi.org/10.22114/ajem.v0i0.185
Section
Case (report / study)

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