Endotracheal Intubation of COVID-19 Patients

  • Zahid Hussain Khan Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5017-6819
  • Jalil Makarem Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mojgan Rahimi Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) emerged for the first time in China and then rapidly spread and swept the entire world like a tornado killing thousands of patients around the planet. People were advised to stay in-doors to prevent the spread of this deadly disease, and this slogan helped to a greater extent in containing the spread of the virus. Unfortunately, there is no treatment for the disease at present, but extensive research is going on to find a definitive treatment. Regarding endotracheal intubation (ETI) of COVID-19 patients, data are scarce and no randomized clinical trials are available to develop and formulate succinct and acceptable guidelines in tackling the problem of ETI in these highly risky and vulnerable patients.

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References

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Published
2020-04-09
How to Cite
Khan, Z. H., Makarem, J., & Rahimi, M. (2020). Endotracheal Intubation of COVID-19 Patients. Advanced Journal of Emergency Medicine, 4(2s). https://doi.org/10.22114/ajem.v0i0.374
Section
Letter to the editor