A 24-year-old Female Traumatic Patient Following a Car Accident

  • Atousa Akhgar Emergency Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2742-5784
  • Seyed-Hasan Imami-Razavi Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Shervin Farahmand Emergency Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6588-9125
  • Seyedhossein Seyedhosseini-Davarani Emergency Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0929-1524
  • Shahram Bagheri-Hariri Emergency Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9818-0411
  • Ali Labaf Emergency Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4449-2479
  • Mohammad-Reza Keramati Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0099-7114
  • Mohammad Zarei Orthopedics Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Morteza Noparast Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Hadi Mirfazaelian Emergency Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9299-8928

Abstract

A healthy 24-year-old female presented at the emergency department (ED) after a car accident with ambulance while injured severely after the bus got run over her lower limb. As the trauma team was activated, her primary survey was started: Ac (Airway and cervical collar): She was awake and could talk. Cervical collar was fixed, oxygenation with face mask was started. B (Breathing): Her chest rising was symmetrical without any laceration or abrasion. Chest auscultation was clear and there was no tenderness or crepitation on palpation. No tracheal shift was found. She had normal respiratory rate and O2 saturation of 94% at ambient air. C (Circulation): Two large bore IV lines were inserted and blood samples were obtained. Her vital signs were BP = 60/40 mmHg, PR = 130/min, RR = 12. E-FAST was performed which was negative for free fluid in abdomen, pelvis and thorax, tamponade, and hemopneumothorax. Her pelvis was unstable on examination and pelvic wrapping was performed with sheath. IV fluid therapy with normal saline was started followed by 3 units of packed RBC transfusion. More pack cells and FFP were also requested. D (Disability): She had Glasgow coma scale of 15/15 with normal size and reactive pupil. No neurologic deficit was found except disability of lower extremities due to crush injury. E (Exposure): She had no midline spinal tenderness with normal sphincter anal tone, but there was a laceration in the perineum which extended to the vagina. Portable chest and pelvic x-ray as an adjutant to primary survey were performed which showed type C pelvic fracture. On her secondary survey, she had abrasion on her scalp, 1.5 cm laceration on her right tibia, deformity of her right thigh, and laceration in her genitalia with some vaginal bleeding. Direct pressure was applied and all lacerations were packed. According to negative e-FAST and pelvic fracture and shock, since the angiography was not available, it was decided to fix the pelvis with external fixator in the operation room. After the fixation, and because shock persisted, operative pelvic packing was undertaken. Unfortunately, she suffered cardiorespiratory arrest in the operating room and died.

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Published
2018-04-12
How to Cite
Akhgar, A., Imami-Razavi, S.-H., Farahmand, S., Seyedhosseini-Davarani, S., Bagheri-Hariri, S., Labaf, A., Keramati, M.-R., Zarei, M., Noparast, M., & Mirfazaelian, H. (2018). A 24-year-old Female Traumatic Patient Following a Car Accident. Advanced Journal of Emergency Medicine, 2(3), e38. https://doi.org/10.22114/ajem.v0i0.82
Section
Multidisciplinary traumatic case management