Radiation Exposure in Patients with Multiple Trauma in Level 2 and 3 Triage During first 48 Hours of Admission; a Cross-Sectional Study

  • Sepehr Eslami ORCID Department of Orthopedics, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
  • Amirmohammad Ghanei ORCID Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
  • Neda Azin ORCID Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
  • Amir-Bahador Boroumand ORCID Mail Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
Keywords:
Emergency Service, Hospital, Multiple Trauma, Radiation Exposure, Radiography

Abstract

Introduction: Recently, radiological imaging could be help to diagnose injury in the patients with multiple trauma in the emergency department (ED). Objective: In this study, we aimed to compare the radiation exposure within 48 hours, in patients with multiple trauma in level 2 and 3 triage admitted to ED. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted on patients with multiple trauma of Level 2 and 3 triage who were referred during 2014-2015 to the EDs of Imam Khomeini Hospital of Tehran and Alzahra hospital of Isfahan, Iran. Radiation exposure of radiographies and computed tomography (CT) scans in patients were calculated during the first 48 hours of admission. Results: In this study, 220 patients with the mean age of 35.41±15.04 years were studied of whom 120 patients (54.5%) were male. The mean radiation exposure was 3.43±3.12 mSv. The mean radiation exposure of CT-scan in level 2 was significantly higher than level 3 (p<0.001). On the other hand, the mean radiation exposure of radiography in level 3 was significantly higher than level 2 (p=0.022). Also, the mean radiation exposure of total radiation in level 2 was significantly higher than level 3 (p<0.001). Conclusion: In 48 hours admitting to emergency department, patients with multiple trauma in Level 2 had more radiation exposure than Level 3.

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Published
2019-09-23
How to Cite
1.
Eslami S, Ghanei A, Azin N, Boroumand A-B. Radiation Exposure in Patients with Multiple Trauma in Level 2 and 3 Triage During first 48 Hours of Admission; a Cross-Sectional Study. Adv J Emerg Med. 4(3):e69.
Section
Original article