An Unusual Case of Accidental Ingestion of a Toothbrush

  • Ritin Mohindra ORCID Department of Internal Medicine, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
  • Nayan H B ORCID Department of Emergency Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Roshan Mathew ORCID Mail Department of Emergency Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Gyan Ranjan Rout ORCID Department of Gastroenterology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Kanav Kaushal ORCID Department of Gastroenterology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Praveen Aggarwal ORCID Department of Emergency Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
Keywords:
Case Reports, Endoscopy, Foreign Bodies, Psychotic Disorders, Toothbrush

Abstract

Introduction: Foreign body ingestion is a common presenting complaint in the emergency department. While ingestion of small foreign bodies like coins and button batteries is not uncommon, ingestion of long and rigid foreign bodies like toothbrush is very rare. Case presentation: We describe a 36-year-old man who presented to us after accidental ingestion of a toothbrush. The patient underwent urgent endoscopic removal; Psychiatric evaluation revealed an acute and transient psychotic disorder in him. Conclusion: Ingestion of long and rigid foreign bodies like a toothbrush is an uncommon entity. Such foreign bodies when ingested find it difficult to maneuver through the GI tract, which makes their spontaneous passage almost impossible. Their ingestion is associated with increased risk of impaction, perforation and, bleeding. Therefore, early removal of the ingested toothbrush is recommended before complications develop.

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Published
2019-10-10
How to Cite
1.
Mohindra R, B N, Mathew R, Rout G, Kaushal K, Aggarwal P. An Unusual Case of Accidental Ingestion of a Toothbrush. Adv J Emerg Med. 4(3):e78.
Section
Case (report / study)